July 14, 2024 4:27 am

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Home » International » industry.” Osai Ojigho, Director of Policy and Public Campaigns at Christian Aid, said: “Roses are a special part of the Valentine’s Day tradition but with many of them grown in parts of the world vulnerable to climate change, their future is far from rosy. These blooms bring joy, and are a vital income for growers in the global south, yet these livelihoods are endangered by the rising carbon emissions and the seemingly endless pursuit of fossil fuels from rich nations like the UK. “We need to see far more urgent action from governments to invest in renewables and also commit the needed climate finance to help farmers adapt to a climate crisis they did almost nothing to cause.” Patrick Mbugua, General Manager, Wildfire Flowers, Kenya said: “I am very concerned about the impact of climate change on rose growing in Kenya. We’ve seen increased disease pressure due to unusual weather patterns, sometimes we have excessive hot weather which sees a jump in the number of pests, and other times unusually low temperatures which increases fungal infections, reducing yields. “Another example is availability of water for irrigation. While this has not yet affected us since our source of water from Lake Naivasha has been very stable the last 10 years, it is a concern that with climate change such a source could be threatened. “It is paramount for governments to have clear policy regarding reducing emissions and developing other interventions that can help with climate change. Governments must especially safeguard local economies and social wellbeing from the impacts of emissions.” Mohamed Adow, Director of Nairobi-based climate and energy think tank, Power Shift Africa, said: “Roses are a major part of the Kenyan economy, with more than half a million people relying on them for their livelihoods. The erratic climate, the extreme temperatures and drought that harm rose cultivation, is what scientists have been warning about for years. The inaction of political leaders to reduce carbon emissions has put an important industry in jeopardy.”

industry.” Osai Ojigho, Director of Policy and Public Campaigns at Christian Aid, said: “Roses are a special part of the Valentine’s Day tradition but with many of them grown in parts of the world vulnerable to climate change, their future is far from rosy. These blooms bring joy, and are a vital income for growers in the global south, yet these livelihoods are endangered by the rising carbon emissions and the seemingly endless pursuit of fossil fuels from rich nations like the UK. “We need to see far more urgent action from governments to invest in renewables and also commit the needed climate finance to help farmers adapt to a climate crisis they did almost nothing to cause.” Patrick Mbugua, General Manager, Wildfire Flowers, Kenya said: “I am very concerned about the impact of climate change on rose growing in Kenya. We’ve seen increased disease pressure due to unusual weather patterns, sometimes we have excessive hot weather which sees a jump in the number of pests, and other times unusually low temperatures which increases fungal infections, reducing yields. “Another example is availability of water for irrigation. While this has not yet affected us since our source of water from Lake Naivasha has been very stable the last 10 years, it is a concern that with climate change such a source could be threatened. “It is paramount for governments to have clear policy regarding reducing emissions and developing other interventions that can help with climate change. Governments must especially safeguard local economies and social wellbeing from the impacts of emissions.” Mohamed Adow, Director of Nairobi-based climate and energy think tank, Power Shift Africa, said: “Roses are a major part of the Kenyan economy, with more than half a million people relying on them for their livelihoods. The erratic climate, the extreme temperatures and drought that harm rose cultivation, is what scientists have been warning about for years. The inaction of political leaders to reduce carbon emissions has put an important industry in jeopardy.”

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industry.”

Osai Ojigho, Director of Policy and Public Campaigns at Christian Aid, said: “Roses are a special part of the Valentine’s Day tradition but with many of them grown in parts of the world vulnerable to climate change, their future is far from rosy. These blooms bring joy, and are a vital income for growers in the global south, yet these livelihoods are endangered by the rising carbon emissions and the seemingly endless pursuit of fossil fuels from rich nations like the UK.

“We need to see far more urgent action from governments to invest in renewables and also commit the needed climate finance to help farmers adapt to a climate crisis they did almost nothing to cause.”

Patrick Mbugua, General Manager, Wildfire Flowers, Kenya said: “I am very concerned about the impact of climate change on rose growing in Kenya. We’ve seen increased disease pressure due to unusual weather patterns, sometimes we have excessive hot weather which sees a jump in the number of pests, and other times unusually low temperatures which increases fungal infections, reducing yields.

“Another example is availability of water for irrigation. While this has not yet affected us since our source of water from Lake Naivasha has been very stable the last 10 years, it is a concern that with climate change such a source could be threatened.

“It is paramount for governments to have clear policy regarding reducing emissions and developing other interventions that can help with climate change. Governments must especially safeguard local economies and social wellbeing from the impacts of emissions.”

Mohamed Adow, Director of Nairobi-based climate and energy think tank, Power Shift Africa, said: “Roses are a major part of the Kenyan economy, with more than half a million people relying on them for their livelihoods. The erratic climate, the extreme temperatures and drought that harm rose cultivation, is what scientists have been warning about for years. The inaction of political leaders to reduce carbon emissions has put an important industry in jeopardy.”

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